PHVP 3409 Week 19 (Long Post)

In the last tutorial I have mentioned many things and during the time, I tried to achieve it.  After looking at Jim Rice photographs I have tried to experiment slightly in overexposing the faces that they would be more noticeable in the photographs. Here is couple of examples from before & after:

The difference is not that huge, but it still makes a face to pop out more. In my point of view, face in portrait is most important part 🙂 

Before my interim assessment presentation on Wednesday I had still some time to capture some people and decided to concentrate more on timeless locations. In my previous examples of work it is possible to see various distracting shop signs, posters and etc. which just really don’t add anything for the picture. Viewers attention goes on them rather than on the subject. So, from now on I will try to pay attention to details and avoid unnecessary objects in my portraits. I noticed from my work and also from the others that timeless locations makes you wonder more about the picture itself and when these photos were being taken.

Last time I mentioned here, that I will share a photo copied photos from The Forgotten Ones by Milton Rogovin and here they are:

As you can see from these images above, everything just works. It is difficult to explain of how I work with the strangers, but I want to show them in serious way and maybe an eye contact creates that look which keeps you watching and thinking about the portrait. 

A little bit more contemporary photographer called ZOLTÁN JÓKAY has done series of portraits around 2000s as well. He used colour film and probably a 35 mm film camera to achieve such results, however most of his pictures are slightly out of focus… For the wish to separate subject from the environment, photographer needed to blurry the background while using fast lenses and wide apertures. Nevertheless, of not perfect focus, all his subjects are having their own time and Zoltan captured them in the way of how I am trying to do it. For me it is quite easier to focus, I guess, because my widest aperture on Bronica is only 2.8 and he probably used 1.4.

Talking about colors and remembering William Hoiles about which I wrote in previous post as well, colorful portraits are more vivid and provides you more visual information in my opinion. However, I noticed that when you tell your subjects that you still shoot on b&w film, I can spot their even bigger confidence in me.   

You may ask, why I like stronger contrast in my all b&w portraits and the answer is quite simple. According to my practice, higher contrast and adjustments in middle tones allows me to highlight a face, the details of skin, clothes and a blurry background.  For example: in the photo album Asakusa Portraits by Hiroh Kikai photographer captured all his really great portraits in the same location, however the soft contrast just doesn’t look great for me. Subjects are all fine, but contrast not. 

Here is my couple of portraits which I have captured before my presentation for Wednesday:

During my presentation Greg and Nick were really positive about my experiments with strangers and encouraged not to stop and keep taking such portraits. They offered me to see some of the Daniel Meadows portraits made during the 70s because both of them agreed that my way of showing and capturing people is quite the same to Meadows. According to tutors it is quite unique nowadays to see such portraits. Here is a couple of examples of Daniel Meadows portraits which are actually quite similar to my work.

Last week I was looking through my all negatives since the 1st year and found this image with the dog & his owner. Personally, I like this portrait because of their gaze and position and it made me to make a short experiment. Now, I am taking pictures with people and asking some general questions, however I thought that I could try to photograph people but WITH their dogs. That would be something different and more interesting perhaps because everyone likes the dogs and it wouldn’t be so similar to my inspiration – Humans of New York. I tried.

So, I have met couple of owners and with each had a great chats about their dogs, however I found it quite difficult to capture, because dogs were moving, waving their heads… I realized that this idea is worth expanding, but certainly not on the film camera and surely with colors, not in black & white. 

During the presentation Greg offered me to check Keith Arnatt’s series called Walking the Dog and when I took a book I’am real photographer from the library, I smiled. Those pictures with dogs and their owners were so good, that I will definitely try to keep doing this project behind my main one. I am not sure if I should use color film on this or just capture it digitally, but I already feel that this project could receive a lot of feedback. 

During my 2nd year, Nick had a lighting workshop in the studio where he explained and showed such technique. You underexpose the picture and compensate the difference with a flashgun. The results are always eye catching because you don’t see such images everyday and so I wanted to experiment that technique on my Bronica SQ-A.

 I felt a need to add something to my portrait images and after spending about 10 minutes, I managed to capture the image. I don’t know if you can see the light coming from the right side, but with more practice, I reckon I could achieve even better results.

That’s it for this time. I am going to take some images now.

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Raymond Depardon – Manhattan Out

Last I week I went to my University Library and I took a huge bunch of various photo albums for a deeper investigation I really didn’t mind the author because for me it’s more interesting to find something new which I haven’t heard about before. So, this Wednesday I am dedicating to still living French photographer, photojournalist and documentary film maker Raymond Depardon. I don’t want to expand very biographically but I will mention that Raymond belongs to Magnum Photographers community and has won Pulitzer Prize in 1977 as a photo-journalist.

The book which I found in library has quite interesting story. Raymond has never been a street photographer but at 1980 winter he came to the New York with his friend. While she worked, Depardon used to walk around the city and take photos of random people. He was terrified of New York, because couldn’t speak in English etc..  He decided to never look through viewfinder and take pictures from the waist level.

Despite the fact of those photographs, Raymond didn’t felt quite confident somehow and even had a fear to develop the films.  When he saw pictures for the first time, Depardon was disappointed of bad compositions and similar things and put all those photographs away for 27 years. After such long period of time, Raymond  with the help of another friend had a chance to see and enlarge them again and eventually noticed something very unique. A lot of Americans were looking straight at the camera lens!

Personally, after seeing this photo album which you can purchase from Amazon for quite reasonable price, I came up with conclusion that taking photographs from the waist level is really good technique because people have no idea  if someone is taking a photographs of them and sometimes wrong composition just makes image more stronger.

Here is some images from the photo album.

Fuji Superia X-TRA 400

Hello Hello!!

Today I want to quickly share some photos taken with Fuji Superia X-TRA 400 film and Yashica Electro 35 GSN rangefinder.I decided to try shooting on colour again, however this film slightly disappointed because of colour tones. I reckon that other films such like Kodak Ektar or Kodak Portra could be able to produce better results. I will test these in a couple of weeks 😉

Enjoy!

P.S. I am currently preparing an interesting review about Yashica Electro 35 GSN camera with photo examples! Don’t miss it!! 🙂

Yashica Electro 35 GSN

Yashica Electro 35 GSN (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fred Herzog

Another Saturday came and I am dedicating this lovely afternoon to a very interesting photographer about which I have never heard before. His name is Fred Herzog (1930 September 21). In De Montfort University library, I came up with this monograph and tried to look and get deeper with his works. This photo album with artist essay and interview can be easily bought from Amazon.

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Fred Herzog had a hard childhood because during his early childhood he lost his both parents, abandoned school and moved to Canada from Germany. Eventually, he established in Vancouver and straight away started taking photographs in the streets because he felt particular interest in taking photographs with people..

While spreading pages through the book, only then I realised that he is one of the first 35 mm colour photography pioneers. During the 50s, 60s serious organisations such like Magnum and many other photographers were shooting entirely on Black and White films because it seemed to be more appropriate at that era, not that distracting and much cheaper. Colour Photography during those times were related with special occasions or travel snapshots. To make prints from color slides were not only difficult to produce around 60s but also they were very expensive and often chemically unstable.

Fred Herzog wanted to intimate journalism in a city environment and felt that someone has to do it, because people in the future would only be able to see how people looked at those time in Life or Time magazines…

winner cafe portland 1959 by fred herzog

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granville and robson 1959 by fred herzogPersonally, while looking at the pictures I couldn’t believe of such great quality colour images taken with the film camera around 1960s. Most of them looks like photographed with Digital camera. Another quite interesting thing which I have noticed looking at Fred’s images is that he also tended to photograph and capture neon lights at night, shop display windows, cars, various companies signs, all the suburbs and back yards with interesting stuff.  (There are some similarities to another very famous still living street and fashion photographer William Klein works.)This year while taking photographs in the streets I became interesting in familiar subjects and, perhaps, for the next year, I will dedicate one module for Urban Landscape theme.

To sum up, Fred Herzog is very interesting and talented photographer who is still living and I reckon, that every photographer should take a look to his works. It is uncommon chance to see early 50s and 60s America in colour!

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Daily Leicester

Hello Everyone!!

I must apologise for such long silence from me.. During this period of time I was so busy working with my university works that I didn’t have enough time for this blog. Today is Monday the 29th and that means that in a morning I will be handing in my final project for university. Do you want to know more about this project??

For this assessment I am handing in 14 best images taken from 2012 September until 2013 end of April. This series I called Daily Leicester (currently I live in this city) which shows and represents the daily life of my neighbourhood. I tried to concentrate on interesting people and worth capturing moments which could show Leicester as a fast pace city. I don’t want to expand very much because I think that photographs should be able to speak for themselves.

In previous post I have mentioned about 5 rolls of different films about which I really haven’t forgotten. On Tuesday I have my last handing in for Uni and then I will dedicate more time for this Blog and Street Photography.

I am attaching a gallery of images which you have probably seen already for my final assessment. Please take a look and leave a comments if you like it. 🙂

Raymond Depardon – Manhattan Out

From now on, I will try to dedicate every Saturday for someone who inspires me or are worth looking at. I will try to concentrate more on street photographers from all around the world, but if I will find someone  interesting from different area I will share with you as well.

Raymond Depardon – Manhattan Out

Last I week I went to my University Library and I took a huge bunch of various photo albums for deeper investigation. I really didn’t mind the author  because for me it’s more interesting to find something new which I haven’t heard about before. So, this Saturday I am dedicating to still living French photographer, photojournalist and documentary filmmaker Raymond Depardon. I don’t want to expand very biographically but I will mention that Raymond belongs to Magnum Photographers community and has won Pulitzer Prize in 1977 as a photo-journalist.

The book which I found in library has quite interesting story. Raymond has never been a street photographer but at 1980 winter he came to the New York with his friend. While she worked, Depardon used to walk around the city and take photos of random people. He was teriffied of New York, because couldn’t speak in english etc.  He decided to never look through viewfinder and take pictures from the waist level.

Despite the fact of those photographs, Raymond didn’t felt quite confident somehow and even had a fear to develop the films.  When he saw pictures for the first time, Depardon was disappointed of bad compositions  and simillar things and put all those photographs away for 27 years. After such long period of time, Raymond  with the help of friend had a chance to see and enlarge them again and eventually noticed something very unique.  A lot of Americans were looking stright at the camera lens!

Personally, after seeing this photo album which you can purchase from Amazon for quite reasonable price, I came up with conclusion that taking photographs from the waist level is really good technique because people have no idea someone is taking a photographs of them and sometimes wrong composition just makes image more stronger.

Here is some images from the photo album.

 

Similarity to street photographer Bruce Gilden

Last year autumn I was taking some images on 35 mm film around the city and when I developed that film I have noticed something worth looking.

All street photographers should know famous still living photographer Bruce Gilden and perhaps some of them are familliar with this photo taken years ago.bruce

After doing some research for my studies, I somehow remembered this photograph from Bruce Gilden and when developed and looked closer to my picture I became astonished. If you look closer, you will find so many similarities. Let’s start from composing the pictures – They are vertical images and persons are placed closer to the right side of image.  Both man wear hats and are looking downwards. Both man are smoking and they are in precise body position (Hands and legs gestures).  Isn’t that nice coincidence? img042

02 Further Investigation

Early this morning I have received my second monograph which I called 02, Further Investigation.  Last year, I made a decision to publish one monograph each year with the best images taken in that period of time. Withouth street photography, I am also quite interested in nightclub and music festival photography so I this year I dedicated this album for these 3 areas in which I have strongest skills. If you want to know, I have created this book with Blurb software which has easy and simple layout that everyone could be able to make albums..  1/3 of this monograph I have dedicated to my street photography images and I am posting those images under. Some of them are taken with my trusty Nikon D7000, some of them with 35 mm film camera Nikon F65 and some of them even with medium format Bronica ETR-Si and Mamiya RZ 67 PRO2. About these two medium format cameras I’ll talk a little bit later 😉
If you want to purchase my monographs, please take a look at this link.
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My Nikon D7000

Yesterday I showed you couple of images taken on my first film roll from Yashica Electro 35 GSN and after posting that message here I went to my neighbourhood to take some more images! Currently, I have a holidays, so I have been slowly taking photos almost 3 weeks now because my assessments for university are getting closer. This Monday I will have to develop at least 4 b&w films and I know that there are really great shots.. Today, I want to show you some of my images taken previously on DSLR, because I am taking photogaphs on digital as well, however 35 mm and 120 film is more interesting for me.

I started taking photographs in the streets with my Nikon D7000 and 35mm 1.8f  prime lens, but straight away I noticed that my subjects were too far from me, so I decided to buy probably cheapest from nikon but very very good 50mm 1.8 lens. Henry Cartier – Bresson always worked with 50 mm lens, so I thought that it should really be a great choice 😉  I am not sure why images quality is so low, but tomorrow I wil try to fix it 🙂 If you want to see larger photos – just click on them.